Medicare in our later years

I could tell from the tone of my mother’s voice something was different.

As some of you know, my mother is 96 years old. Long widowed.

Like many of your parents she grew up in the depths of the Great Depression and lost brothers in World War II.

She worked 42 years…not for “Sears”… but for “Sears and Roebuck.”

She has gradually downsized over the years from the three bedroom house I grew up in in Memphis to an independent living facility near our home in Knoxville, Tennessee.

2018-02-10 mother and kids
Mother’s Day 2017

 

Overall in good health for 96 taking only medication for her thyroid, blood pressure and arthritis.

“Charlie, I’m okay but I seem to have forgotten everything.

Why are we in Knoxville. I know we’re from Memphis.

And what do you do? Do you still work? Do you have a family? And where is Don (her brother)? I think he got a PhD but where is he now?”

 (She was right…he did get a PhD…in 1962)

She had suddenly lost much of her memory.

Fearing she had had a stroke, my son and I immediately took her to the Emergency Room.

Along the way I asked her several questions to try to measure the degree of her memory loss and whether it was getting better or worse.

When I asked her who was the President she said she did not know. She seemed very surprised when I told her it was Donald Trump. She said she had seen him on tv recently and that must be why he was on tv.

The tests that were run at the hospital showed she did not have a stroke. Typical of someone her age she does have some atrophy in the brain and the blood flow is not as strong as is was.

Three days later there has been little or no change. Yesterday she asked me if my father’s sister Coy – with whom she was close and who died in 2011 – was still alive. When I told her “no” she said she thought she may have died.

I am not sure what the next few days, or weeks or months or years will be like.

Her safety and comfort is my primary concern.

I am taking her to a neurologist next week so we can try to get a better understanding of what has happened and what is likely to happen.

The government tells us that 75 percent of the health care costs we incur in our life takes place in the last 18 months of our life.

I am very glad my mother has regular Medicare with a Medicare Supplement that allows her to see any doctor or go to any hospital that takes Medicare and pays everything Medicare does not pay.

I know we will be able to do everything we can to keep her as safe, healthy and happy as possible and not have to pay anything.

Unfortunately, I also know many people in situations like hers are not in a Medicare situation that allows then to get the care they need with little or no costs.

Many of our most vulnerable seniors have unknowingly signed over their Medicare benefits to private, for-profit Medicare Advantage plans who ration their health care to maximize their net income.

And the times they deny care to save money the most is in the later stages of life when health care costs are the highest.

The decisions you make about your Medicare when you turn 65 or first go on Medicare can be permanent. Medicare Advantage plans like Humana Gold Plus and Kaiser Permanente who profit hundreds of millions of dollars a year by convincing people to leave Medicare do not explain to people that their choice can be irreversible and they may never be able to return to Medicare and have a Medicare Supplement that pays their share of Medicare’s costs.

I have made it my life’s work to help as many people as possible fully understand how Medicare works and how the choices they make when first going on Medicare can impact their access to the health care they need and their finances the rest of their life.

I would appreciate the chance to help you with your Medicare so you can choose the right Medicare plan for you both now and in the future.

Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation.

Click here to schedule your free, no-obligation Medicare consultation

You can also call me at 888-549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

I look forward to talking with you soon.

p.s. If you know of someone who needs help with their Medicare, please forward this email to them.

Surprise! A Confusing Letter From Medicare

by Charles Bradshaw

2017-07-09 Charles Bradshaw business photo
Charles Bradshaw

I received several calls and emails this week from people who are working past age 65 and still have health insurance from their employer. Because they have coverage from their employer, they have delayed enrolling in Medicare Part B.

They contacted me because they had received a misleading letter from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) advising them that if they want to enroll in Medicare Part B this year they need to apply at their local Social Security office prior to March 31, 2018 and their Medicare Part B coverage will take effect on July 1, 2018.

The letter did not make clear that this only applies to people who are 65 years old or over, who are not enrolled in Medicare Part B and, very importantly, DO NOT have credible health insurance through an employer.

As long as you have credible health insurance coverage through an employer – whether it is your employer or your spouse or legal partner – you can delay going on full Medicare until the time you leave the employer coverage without incurring any penalty now or in the future. You can also begin your Medicare Part B coverage to coincide with when you leave your employer coverage.

At the time you are about to leave your employer coverage, you will need to have the employer complete and sign Employer Form CMS-L564E. You can download this form by clickinghere.

You will then take this completed form to your local Social Security office and you will have a Special Election Period to enroll in Medicare Part B to start when you employer coverage ends.

You will be able to enroll in any Medicare Supplement plan available in your area at that time without answering health questions. You will also be able to enroll in a Medicare Part D drug plan at that time with no Late Enrollment Penalty.

Employer coverage or full Medicare? How to decide

I would appreciate the chance to help you with your Medicare transition when the time is right so you can choose the right Medicare plan for you both now and in the future.

I am also happy to help you evaluate whether your best option is to stay on employer coverage or go on full Medicare.

Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation.

Click here to schedule your free, no-obligation Medicare consultation

You can also call me at 888-549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

I look forward to talking with you soon.

Medicare is not “one-size-fits-all”

2017-07-09 Charles Bradshaw business photo
Charles H. Bradshaw

When you reach the age of being eligible for Medicare, it is reasonable to assume the Medicare system is set up in a way to protect you from making a decision that could permanently reduce your Medicare benefits or force you to pay much more for your health care than your friends, neighbors and others just like you.

Your assumption, while very reasonable, would also be very wrong.

The federal government, in order to save money, has allowed private insurance companies to prey on people going on Medicare in the form of for-profit, restricted-access Medicare Advantage plans. These Medicare Advantage plans from big insurance companies such as Kaiser Permanente and Humana make huge profits by rationing expensive health care and thereby spending less on the health care the person on Medicare needs.

The federal government allows this to happen because the big insurance companies gladly refund a small part of their income from these plans back to the federal government in what is essentially a legal kickback. The federal government also collects more in taxes when these companies make huge profits off of people on Medicare.

As you can expect, the losers in this system are the people on Medicare who unwittingly assume the federal government would be on their side.

When someone going on Medicare enrolls in a private, for-profit, restricted-access Medicare Advantage plan, they are perhaps permanently assigning the Medicare dollars they have earned through their lifetime of hard work to a private company who can then refuse to cover the same services real Medicare would have covered.

The Medicare member is then left without the health care they need to have the best chance for the best health outcome when they are sick.

The results can be catastrophic and even fatal.

Can you imagine having a life-threatening cancer and being in a Medicare Advantage plan that selects the cancer treatment you can receive based on the cost of the treatment rather the likelihood to save your life?

Medicare Advantage plans are doing that every day to someone just like you and can do it to you if you make a bad Medicare choice.

When you first go on Medicare, you owe it to yourself and your loved ones to fully understand how Medicare works and what your options are with Medicare.

You owe it to yourself to understand how bad choices you make when you first go on Medicare can be choices you may not be able to correct later.

However, there is good news. If you make the right decision when you first go on Medicare by staying with real Medicare, you can secure your access to the best healthcare possible the rest of your life with no unexpected costs if you have a serious illness or accident.

You will be able to receive care from whichever doctor or hospital you believe gives you the best chance for the best health outcome and not worry about thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars in unexpected costs.

I would appreciate the opportunity to help you fully understand how Medicare works and what your options are with Medicare so you can make the right Medicare choice for you both now and the rest of your life.

Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation.

You can also call me at 888-549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

I look forward to talking with you soon.

Delaying Medicare – Penalty or No Penalty?

2017-07-09 Charles Bradshaw business photo
Charles Bradshaw

I get many questions about whether there is a penalty if someone does not enroll in Medicare when they are first eligible at age 65.

Unfortunately, there is a tremendous amount of misinformation told to people approaching their Medicare age mainly by high-pressure Medicare sales people who either do not fully understand the complexities of Medicare or who simply will say whatever they think it takes to make a sale regardless of what is best for the person to whom they are supposedly helping.

As long as you have credible health insurance coverage through an employer – whether it is your employer or your spouse or legal partner – you can delay going on full Medicare until the time you leave the employer coverage without incurring any penalty now or in the future.

Here are some important things to know when you are about to turn 65 or are already 65 or older and have the option to stay on your employer coverage.

1) You may want to enroll in Medicare Part A only and not enroll in Medicare Part B. Medicare Part A covers you if you are an in-patient in the hospital or in a Skilled Nursing Facility for rehabilitation.

Unlike Medicare Part B, there is no monthly premium for Medicare Part A. If you go into the hospital or a Skilled Nursing Facility and still have employer coverage, there is a good chance Medicare Part A will pay for some costs for which you will otherwise be responsible.

An exception to this guidance is if you are currently contributing to a Health Savings Account (HSA). If you are contributing to an HSA you should not enroll in Medicare Part A only as you cannot contribute to an HSA once your Medicare Part A is effective.

2) Once you are 65, you have the choice of staying on your employer coverage or going on full Medicare. This is a decision you must make yourself. Your employer is prohibited by federal law from encouraging you to leave their coverage and go on full Medicare. However, it is often the right choice financially and healthwise for you to go on full Medicare.

Employer coverage or full Medicare? How to decide

3) If you choose to stay on your employer coverage past when you are eligible for Medicare, you can choose to change to full Medicare at any time. Your right to go on full Medicare at any time supersedes the election timetable your employer has for their coverage.

4) Once you decide to leave employer coverage and go on full Medicare, you will need to have your employer complete and sign form CMS-L564E – a form provided by Social Security in which your employer attests you have had credible health insurance with them and verifies when you are leaving that coverage.

You will then need to take this completed form CMS-L564E to your local Social Security office and they will enroll you in Medicare Part B (and Medicare Part A if you do not already have Medicare Part A) to coincide with when you leave your employer coverage.

5) When you first go on Medicare Part B, you will be able to enroll in any Medicare Supplement plan – including Plan G – offered in your area with no health questions because you will be in your 6-month Open Enrollment period that commences with your Medicare Part B effective date.

A Plan G Medicare Supplement, combined with Medicare Parts A and B, will allow you to go to any doctor or hospital anywhere in the country that accepts regular Medicare – as almost all do – and all of your costs will be covered 100 percent after you pay Medicare Part B’s once-a-year deductible of only $183.

You will also be able to enroll in a Medicare Part D drug plan without penalty because you will have a two-month Special Election Period due to losing the drug coverage with your employer plan.

I would appreciate the chance to help you with your Medicare transition when the time is right so you can choose the right Medicare plan for you both now and in the future.

I am also happy to help you evaluate whether your best option is to stay on employer coverage or go on full Medicare.

Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation.

You can also call me at 888-549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

I look forward to talking with you soon.

Real Medicare Versus Private Medicare

2017-07-09 Charles Bradshaw business photo
Charles Bradshaw

I would like to ask you a very simple question that will help you decide how you will receive and pay for your health care for the rest of your life.

Which of the following two goals is most important for you and your family:

1) To be able to get the best health care possible from the doctors or hospitals I believe give me the best chance for the best health outcome with little or no unplanned cost.

Or

2) To help make a big insurance company like Humana more profit and their executives richer even if it means cutting back on my health care and reducing my chances of getting well if I have a serious health problem.

I don’t believe anyone is going to select #2.

However, if you permanently sign over your Medicare benefits to a private Medicare plan such as Kaiser or Humana, you are potentially placing your health care for the rest of your life in the control of a company who will ration your health care if you become sick to maximize their profits – even if doing so reduces your chance for the best health outcome.

This happens because a private, for-profit Medicare Advantage plan operates under a much more restrictive set of guidelines when it determines what tests, treatments or surgeries it will approve.

There are many times real Medicare – also called regular Medicare or original Medicare – will approve an expensive procedure such as an MRI or a new, expensive cancer treatment when a private Medicare Advantage plan will say “no” in order to save money.

When you opt-out of real Medicare and enroll in a private Medicare plan, Medicare no longer pays your medical bills. Instead, the federal government sends your Medicare dollars to the private company who somehow convinced you it was a good idea to let them make your health care decisions instead of you and your doctor.

Every time a private Medicare Advantage plan says “no” to an expensive medical procedure when real Medicare would have said “yes”, the private plan increases their income while decreasing your chance for the best health outcome.

Sadly, if you opt-out of real Medicare for a private Medicare plan, your opportunity to change your mind later will be either extremely limited or possibly non-existent. This is because leaving a private Medicare plan and returning to real Medicare with a Medicare Supplement that pays your share of Medicare almost always requires you to answer a lengthy list of health questions and verify you are in good health.

Fortunately, if you have not yet started Medicare, you can stay with real Medicare and enroll in a Medicare Supplement that takes effect when your Medicare starts without answering health questions. You will be approved for this wonderful coverage that allows you to choose any doctor or hospital anywhere in the country that accepts Medicare – as almost all do – regardless of your health and you will always be able to keep this coverage regardless of any health conditions you develop in the future.

If you have already opted out of real Medicare and assigned your Medicare benefits to a private, for-profit, restricted access Medicare Advantage plan, you can choose to return to Real Medicare prior to February 14, 2018. However, in order to qualify for a Medicare Supplement that will pay your share of Medicare, you will likely have to answer health questions and be in fairly good health.

I would appreciate the chance to help you understand your Medicare options so you can choose the right Medicare plan for you both now and in the future.

Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation.

You can also call me at 888-549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

I look forward to talking with you soon.

Employer Coverage or Full Medicare? How to Decide.

2017-08-09 Charles Bradshaw
Charles H.Bradshaw

The question I receive more than any other when someone is turning 65 and becoming eligible for Medicare is “What do I do about Medicare if I am still working and have coverage through my employer?

There are several different issues to consider when answering this question.

The first thing to know is when you turn 65 and are still working, you have a choice between staying on your employer’s coverage or leaving that coverage and going on full Medicare.

By “full Medicare” I am referring to having both Medicare Parts A and B along with a Medicare Supplement to pay your share of Medicare and a Medicare Part D drug plan to pay most of the cost of any medications you take now or may take in the future .

In many situations it is advisable to enroll in Medicare Part A only even if you have employer coverage. Medicare Part A has no monthly premium and may cover some of your costs if you have an in-patient hospital stay or skilled nursing stay. This is not “full Medicare.”

When choosing between staying on employer coverage and or leaving employer coverage and going on full Medicare, the choice requires a comparison of your monthly costs under both options as well as your potential costs if you become sick. This is not a choice the Employee Benefits department at your employer can help you make. In fact, federal law prohibits employers from assisting employees with evaluating their Medicare options even if full Medicare is the best option for the employee.

Let’s start with full Medicare first. In most states, you will pay a little less than $300 per month for Medicare Parts A and B as well as a Medicare Supplement and Medicare Part D drug plan. With this coverage, you will have a once-a-year Medicare Part B deductible of $183 and after that all of your medical costs will be covered 100 percent for the rest of the year.

Now, compare this cost to not only what you will pay per month for your employer coverage but also what your potential out-of-pocket costs may be if you become sick or have an accident. In many situations, your monthly cost for your employer coverage may be a little less than you would pay with full Medicare but your deductible and other out-of-pocket costs may be much higher than with full Medicare.

Many employer plans now have annual deductibles as high as $3,000 or $4,000 or even more and out-of-pocket maximums of $6,000 or more. If you have existing health issues, you may already be certain to spend some or all of such a high deductible and out-of-pocket maximum every year.

In most situations, it only takes a minimal amount of annual health care needs each year to make full Medicare a less costly option than employer coverage because of the higher deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums with most employer coverage.

The choice between staying on employer coverage and going on full Medicare is not a one-time decision. Once you are past your Medicare eligibility date, you can choose to leave employer coverage at any time to go on full Medicare. This includes during the middle of the year. You do not have to wait until your employer’s annual election process.

There are a few additional things to consider when choosing between remaining on your employer coverage or going on full Medicare.

  1. You may need to stay on employer coverage to maintain coverage for your spouse or dependent if they are not yet Medicare-eligible.
  2. If you take any expensive medications, those medications may be covered at a lower cost with employer coverage than with a Medicare Part D drug plan.
  3. If you contribute to a Health Savings Account (HSA) with your employer coverage, you will no longer be able to do so once you enroll in Medicare Part A – even if you do not enroll in Medicare Part B.
  4. With full Medicare, you can receive health care from any doctor or hospital anywhere in the country that accepts Medicare as almost all do. This means you may have more choices in your health care providers than you would given the network limitations of most employer coverage.
  5. In some states – such as Florida – you will pay more for your Medicare Supplement if you first enroll at an age later than 65. While this is not a major cost difference, it could make choosing to move to full Medicare the best choice if the decision is a close call.
  6. There is almost no situation where it is a good idea to enroll in Medicare Part B while you have employer coverage. The cost for Medicare Part B is $134 per month and the combination of both coverages rarely pays any cost that full Medicare would not already pay. In addition, by starting Medicare Part B while you still have employer coverage, you may lose some options for choosing a Medicare Supplement you will eventually need once you eventually leave your employer coverage.

Whether you are about to turn 65 and become eligible for Medicare or if you are 65 or older and still on employer coverage, I would appreciate the chance to work with you to help you compare your employer coverage options with full Medicare.

Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation.

You can also call me at 888-549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

I look forward to talking with you soon.

Getting Diet Advice From McDonald’s

A gentleman named Edward from Nashville scheduled a Medicare consultation with me that took place yesterday.

When I called Edward, I could tell right away he was stressed out about the fact he was turning 65 in a few months and going on Medicare. He told me he was getting bombarded with all kinds of mail and phone calls about Medicare and was having a hard time keeping up.

2017-08-09 Charles Bradshaw
Charles Bradshaw 

I told him to take every piece of mail he had received about Medicare from anyone except the government and put it in the nearest recycle bin. I also told him to stop taking calls from anyone he did not know. 

Nearly 100 percent of the mail or phone calls you receive about Medicare when you are about to turn 65 is from a company wanting to make a lot of money off of your hard-earned Medicare benefits.

These companies such as Humana and United Healthcare are not trying to help you learn how Medicare works and what your options are with Medicare. They are mainly trying to steer you toward their private, for-profit, restricted-choice Medicare Advantage plans that can be catastrophically bad for both your health and finances.

They are literally attempting to get you to permanently sign over your Medicare benefits so they can divert your Medicare dollars away from spending on your health and to their profits.

Trying to learn what you need to know about Medicare from Humana is the same as getting diet advice from McDonald’s.

When you sign over your Medicare benefits to a private, for-profit Medicare Advantage Plan such as Humana Gold Plus, you are giving Humana full control over your health care. Humana will make decisions about the health care you receive and the doctors you can see based on the cost rather than what gives you the best chance for the best health outcome.

The less Humana spends on your health care the more money they make as a company and the higher salaries and bigger bonuses they can pay to themselves.

When you are approaching the time you first go on Medicare, it is critical that you learn how Medicare works from an unbiased source. You need to fully know and understand your Medicare options so you can make the right decision for you both now and in the future.

I started MedicareAnswerCenter to help as many people as possible fully understand their options with Medicare so they can make the right decisions for them. We do not enroll anyone in any Medicare plan until we know they fully understand their options and have decided on a Medicare plan based on what is right for them.

I would appreciate the chance to personally work with you to help you understand your Medicare options so you can choose the Medicare plan that is right for you.

I will make sure you fully understand how the choices you make when you first go on Medicare can impact your access to health care and finances the rest of your life. I will also explain to you how the choices about Medicare you make when you turn 65 may become permanent only a few short months after your Medicare coverage begins.

Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation.

You can also call me at 888-549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

I look forward to talking with you soon.

Improving your Medicare Part D Drug Plan

Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Period is from October 15 until December 7.

During this time, you can take the following actions to improve your Medicare coverage

  1. Leave a for-profit, restricted-access Medicare Advantage plan to return to regular Medicare and enroll in a Medicare Supplement and stand-along Medicare Part D drug plan.. You may be required to answer health questions to qualify for the Medicare Supplement.
  2. Improve your Medicare Supplement by switching from a Plan F supplement which is being phased out beginning on 2020 to a more cost effective Plan G Medicare Supplement.
  3. Improve your Medicare Supplement from a Plan N which may require you to pay 15 percent of your medical bills to a Plan G Medicare Supplement that pays all of your cost after a once-a-year Medicare Part B deducitble of $183.
  4. Improve your Medicare Part D drug plan to one which will provide your medications at a lower cost and not have an annual deductible of up to $405.

Today, I want to share with you how to improve your Medicare Part D drug plan.

Most states have around 20-25 options for Medicare Part D drug plans. These plans vary in the following ways:

  • How much is the monthly premium
  • Whether the plan has an annual deductible or not
  • If there is a deductible how much it is
  • If there is a deductible to which drugs does it apply
  • Which drugs does it cover
  • How much it requires you to pay for the drugs you take

Medicare provides a wonderful tool to help you identify which Medicare Part D drug plan will provide your medications at the lowest overall cost.

You can access this tool by clicking on the following link:

Click here to access Medicare’s Part D Plan Finder Tool

You can click on the following links to view 5 short tutorials for using this system”

Medicare Plan Finder Lesson 1: Getting Started

Medicare Plan Finder Lesson 2: Entering Your Prescription Drugs

Medicare Plan Finder Lesson 3: Selecting Pharmacies

Medicare Plan Finder Lesson 4: Refining and Sorting Your Plan Results

Medicare Plan Finder Lesson 5: Comparing Plans

Please note the Plan Finder Tool will create a Drug ID list and a Password so you can recall your drug list later. Please write these down or print them out.

I strongly recommend Medicare Part D drug plans with a 4-Star rating or higher. This rating reflects the satisfaction members have had with this plan.

I also recommend a Medicare Part D drug plan with no annual deductible. Having no annual deductible will save you money if you currently take or are prescribed expensive medications.

Overall, I recommend SilverScript Choice if your drugs are covered under this plan.

Please click the following link for more information about SilverScript Choice :

Click here for information about SilverScript Choice

Please email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com if you would like to enroll in SilverScript Choice.

Improving Your Medicare – Part 1

Avoiding high Plan N out-of-pocket costs

2017-08-09 Charles Bradshaw
Charles Bradshaw President  MedicareAnswerCenter

The Plan N Medicare Supplement was created in 2010 with the Medicare Modernization Act of 2010.

With a Plan N Medicare Supplement, the policy holder can usually save $10 to $20 per month compared to a Plan G Medicare Supplement.

However, the policy holder must potentially pay the following three additional costs – one of which can have a significant impact on accessing the best care

 

 

 

 

  1. A $20 copay for any doctor visit that is not an annual checkup or well woman exam. This is the same for both primary care doctors and specialists
  2. A $50 copay if the policy holder goes to an Emergency Room and is not admitted as an in-patient
  3. All Medicare Part B Excess charges.

What is Medicare Part B Excess?

Some medical providers elect to not accept Medicare’s regular payment schedule so they can collect an extra 15 percent for the services they provide to people on Medicare. This is called Medicare Part B Excess.

As you can expect, the medical providers who choose to charge this extra amount are ones in such high demand they can afford to be selective in choosing who will be their patients.

Prominent medical providers such as Mayo Clinic charge Medicare Part B Excess as well as many prominent cardiologists, orthopedic surgeons, oncologists, rheumatologists, endocrinologists, opthamologists and more.

The percentage of medical providers who charge Medicare Part B excess is increasing every year in all areas of the country.

Even though Medicare Part B Excess applies only to services under Medicare Part B, hospitals have increasingly shifted services that were formerly under Medicare Part A to Medicare Part B. The majority of services received at a hospital such as MRIs, chemotherapy and outpatient surgery are now billed under Medicare Part B.

There are even many situations where a patient who may be in a hospital facility for 3-4 days is billed as “under observation” (Medicare Part B) rather than as an in-patient (Medicare Part A).

Depending on the type of care you receive, this 15 percent additional cost can result in you having to pay several thousand dollars or more out of your pocket.

This extra charge may unfortunately cause you to choose a lower cost provider rather than the doctor or hospital you believe provides you with the best chance for the best health outcome.

Fortunately, a Medicare Supplement Plan G – which is usually only a few dollars more than Plan N – fully pays all Medicare Part B Excess charges. Many people can even obtain a Plan G Medicare Supplement for less than they are currently paying for Plan N.

If you currently have a Plan N Medicare Supplement, it is a very smart move to upgrade to a Plan G Medicare Supplement.

Simply click on the link below to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute appointment with me to enroll in a Plan G Medicare Supplement. Depending on how long you have been on Medicare, your eligibility to enroll in Plan G may be dependent on your current health.

Click here to schedule your appointment 

You can also call (888) 549-1110 or email me at charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com

Also, if you know someone who has a Medicare Supplement Plan N please share this with them so they can understand why they may want to upgrade to a Plan G Medicare Supplement.

 

Who is managing your health?

2017-08-09 Charles Bradshaw
Charles Bradshaw   MedicareAnswerCenter.com

There is only one acceptable answer to this question and that answer is “you.”

 
However, if you make the wrong decision about how to receive your Medicare, your health could be managed by an insurance company’s budget analyst more concerned about the profits of his employer than your best health outcome.
 
When you first go on Medicare – usually at age 65 but often later if you are still working – you can choose to receive your Medicare benefits through regular Medicare combined with a Medicare Supplement and a Medicare Part D drug plan. Or, you can instead assign your Medicare benefits to a private, for-profit, restricted-choice Medicare Advantage plan such as Humana Gold Plus or Kaiser Permanente.
 
When you choose to stay with regular Medicare, you can go to any doctor or hospital anywhere in the country that accepts Medicare as almost all do. This includes such noted medical facilities as Mayo Clinic, Johns Hopkins, M.D. Anderson and Cancer Treatment Centers of America.
 
Importantly, with regular Medicare combined with a Medicare Supplement, all or almost all of your costs are covered 100 percent regardless of your health situation now or in the future.
 
This scenario allows you, along with the doctors you choose, to make the best decisions for your health.
 
On the other hand, if you choose to receive your Medicare through a private, for-profit restricted-access Medicare Advantage plan, your health care decisions are often made by a budget analyst who is focused on managing the costs of your care.
 
With a Medicare Advantage plan, you have a limited choice of doctors and hospitals and you are not fully covered when you travel. Even worse, because a Medicare Advantage plan is focused on its own profits, it will often say “no” to treatments and tests your doctor may think is right for you when regular Medicare would have said “yes.”
 
In today’s internet content-rich world, you have access to a wealth of information about your health and the health care providers you can choose with regular Medicare. You have more control and input into the decisions about your health than any generation before.
 
You should never give up this benefit by assigning your Medicare benefits to a private, for-profit, restricted-choice Medicare Advantage plan.
 
I would appreciate the chance to personally work with you to help you understand your Medicare options so you can choose the Medicare plan that is right for you.
 
Simply click the following link to schedule a free, no-obligation 30-minute Medicare consultation
 
You can also call me at (888) 549-1110 or email charlesbradshaw@medicareanswercenter.com.